Berry cage: holes & materials

Yesterday I started work on a new construction project that I planned a month or two ago: a berry cage in the vegetable garden.

We have a large fenced veggie garden, with multiple raised beds. Some of the beds include blueberries, strawberries, etc, which are targets for birds. Plus we let our chickens into the veggie garden after we’re done with it in fall/winter, so they can clear out the foliage and weeds. But we don’t want them grazing the berries to the ground.

So, I’m building an enclosure: a fence to split the back four beds of the veggie garden from the rest, a wire roof to keep out birds, and gates. This kind of enclosure is commonly called a berry cage.

I started work on this project by measuring the positions for the poles, cutting the fabric on the ground, and hand-digging out the top gravel layer:

I then used my earth auger to dig the holes, about 2′ deep:

Thusly:

I also dug to expose the pipe for this tap at the back of the garden, as it will be moved. I’m going to put a new gate there, to make it easier to get from the veggie garden to the new greenhouse:

Here’s a view of the back part of the garden. The holes in the foreground will be where the front gate of the berry cage will be:

This morning, I received the delivery from Home Depot of the materials:

Several rolls of welded wire fencing, a heap of 8′ and 10′ posts and boards, and gate hardwire:

A closer look at the lumber. The big untreated boards are for a new garden bed in the berry cage:

Stay tuned for construction progress. Next weekend I’ll re-stack this lumber (I need the posts at the bottom first!), cut the back gate, and start installing the posts and beams.

Should be fun.

Chickens in the veggie garden

Now that we’re done with the veggies for the year, it’s time to let the chickens in to clean up the beds. In no time at all they’ll eat all the leftover vegetation, and till the beds.

Here’s a YouTube video:

I cut a hole in the fence from the new run:

Enabling the new chickens to enter the veggie garden:

And re-opened the hole from the old run, for the old girls:

The new chickens didn’t take long to start investigating the garden beds:

For the most part, the two flocks are staying on opposite sides of the garden, though there have been some interactions:

Gallery

Building potato planters

Today I built the potato planters. My first project with the new table saw and nailer; they certainly made the job easier.

I made three planters, for three different varieties of potatoes. I basically stuck to my design, except I decided the interior pole wasn’t needed, since the boards stay in place quite well without, more so with dirt inside the box.

The loose filler boards were cut a bit longer than the sides, to make them easier to grab and remove when harvesting potatoes. I kinda like the interlocking look, too. The boards will be slotted in as the plants grow.

Now we just need to get some dirt!

Potato planter design

Sometimes I’m not too fussed with tidy lines  when drawing in the Linea app. Here, I’m using it to help visualize the frame for a potato planter box. The four sides will have removable boards added as the plants grow.

Making three of these will be my practice project to get used to the new table saw and nailer, before I start work on the new chicken coop.